The Data Dashboard provides a visual representation of student progress on standardized assessments. Although standardized assessment scores are not the sole measure of school performance, they do provide a snapshot of student growth and/or achievement, depending on the test administered. You may click on the links below to view multi-year graphs of student assessment data.

  • NECAP - New England Common Assessment Program, Smarter Balanced, and MEA - Maine Educational Assessment
  • NWEA - Northwest Evaluation Association
    • Northwest Evaluation Association(NWEA), Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) creates a personalized assessment experience by adapting to each student’s learning level.
  • Maine High School Assessment
    • As part of Maine's response to the No Child Left Behind legislation, since 2006 all Maine students in their 3rd year of high school have been required to take SAT tests in critical reading, writing, and mathematics. The lone exception was in 2015, when the State of Maine joined two dozen other states in requiring that schools assess students using the Smarter Balanced test. Maine returned to the SAT requirement for third year high school students in 2016.

District Report Card:

The Elementary and Secondary Schools Act (ESSA) recently replaced the long-standing No Child Left Behind legislation (NCLB). ESSA requires that all public school students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 participate in standardized testing each year.

For approximately two decades testing for Maine students consisted of the Maine Educational Assessment (MEA). Yarmouth schools and students have traditionally performed significantly better than the state average and have often produced the highest scores of any non-magnet, public school district in the state. This is no small accomplishment, as Maine students as a whole out-perform those in most other states. In 2013, Maine 4th graders and 8th graders scored among the top 15 states in math and among the top 20 in reading on the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP). Maine is also one of the states identified as scoring higher than the average of 47 countries or sub-national education systems that participated in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). This is encouraging news, yet Maine schools – and Yarmouth schools in particular – are constantly seeking ways to improve, using data from a wide variety of sources to guide our decision-making processes. In this report we present two sources of data – state and federal accountability programs – that are used to measure our schools’ effectiveness.

Despite these reasons for optimism, we are not resting on the laurels of the performance of former students. The professional educators in Yarmouth continue to seek ways to improve the experience for each student as we strive to attain our mission of “empowering all students to create fulfilling lives in a changing world”.

Federal Accountability – ESSA

In Table 1, below, you will find a summary of each of our schools participating in the federal assessment program (Rowe School does not appear on the list, as students in Kindergarten and Grade 1 are not included in the testing).